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The Low Income Diet and Nutrition Survey (LIDNS) was commissioned to provide for the first time robust, nationally representative, baseline data on food consumption, nutrient intake and nutritional status and factors affecting these in low-income/materially-deprived consumers.

Main Topics/Subject Category
Food consumption, nutrient intake and nutritional status
United Kingdom, adults, age, alcohol consumption, alcoholic drinks, allergies, anthropometric data, artificial sweeteners, attitudes, basic needs, beverages, blood, carbohydrates, child benefits, child care, child welfare, children, chronic illness, clinical tests and measurements, coffee (beverage), cohabitation, consumption, cooking facilities, debilitative illness, dental care, dental health, dentures, diaries, diet and nutrition, economic activity, edible fats, employees, employment, employment history, exercise, family benefits, farms, food, food supplements, fruit, gender, height (physiology), home ownership, home-grown foods, household income, households, housing benefits, housing tenure, hunger, income-related benefits
Identifier Variables
Country, GOR
Economic/Subject Categories
Income, Earnings, Nutrition
Area of Health System
Public health
Data Available
Risk behaviours, Socio-economic, Demographic
Data collecting organization (s)
National Centre for Social Research
Data Type
Survey (cross-sectional)
Coverage (date of field work)
2003, 2005
Unit of Analysis

3728 individuals aged ‡2 years between 2003 and 2005 in Low income (materially deprived) households in the United Kingdom

ESDS Government, UK Data Archive
Conditions of Access
Free registration access
Anderson AS. Nutrition interventions in women in low-income groups in the UK. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 2007; 66: 25–32