Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The paper argues that the problem of obesity can usefully be seen as illustrating a new kind of market failure. At the heart of such failures is the emergence of a sub-optimal choice environment which, though derived from a large number of small individual optimising decisions, is not the choice environment that people would choose if they were able to choose the environment itself. This idea is claimed to be consistent with modern economic theories of freedom of choice and applicable particularly to choice environments that emerge in highly competitive market situations. The retail supply of food and consumer credit is discussed by way of example. Concluding, the paper develops the concept of a 'deliberative economy' as an alternative to liberal paternalism and explores conditions under which such an approach to social choice might deliver desirable outcomes. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/j.1467-6435.2009.00430.x

Type

Journal

Kyklos

Publication Date

06/05/2009

Volume

62

Pages

182 - 190